Ironically knowledge of the curriculum of entrepreneurial revolution - as the net generation's opportunity to collaborate in human sustainability peaked in 1984 - unless you can help us retrieve it now - thans chris macrae wash dc text 240 316 8157 www.worldsocialtrade.com www.www.catholicuni.com amychina.net

online library of norman macrae--

Friday, August 19, 2016


South Central Telehealth Forum 
#SCTF2016

Special thanks to the Sponsors and Exhibitors who helped to make the South Central Telehealth Forum a success by showcasing the latest telehealth products, services and demos! 
Sponsors
Cisco's connected health solutions and services enable new levels of communication and collaboration between patients, providers, payers and life science organizations. Built on a highly-secure network of interoperable technologies, Cisco solutions are crafted to meet the health care community's unique compliance, bandwidth, stability and interoperability requirements.

Connect with CISCO
AT&T is accelerating the delivery of innovative wireless, cloud-based and networking services and applications to help the health care industry improve patient care and reduce costs. AT&T believes the use of mobile technologies and smart networks can help create a healthier world.

Connect with AT&T
iRis Networks delivers state-of-the-art, fiber transport for voice, data and Internet in and around Tennessee. Operating over 5,000 route-miles of fiber, iRis is uniquely positioned because it provides a gateway of broadband transport to over 250 rural communities in Tennessee, Kentucky and Alabama. iRis also provides fully redundant high-capacity transport between the large regional markets of Nashville, Knoxville, Chattanooga, Memphis and Atlanta.

Connect with iRis Networks
The Tennessee Hospital Association (THA) is a not-for-profit membership association that serves as an advocate for hospitals, health systems and other health care organizations and the patients they serve. The THA also provides education and information for its members and informs the public about hospitals and health care issues at the state and national levels.

Connect with THA 
The Center for Distance Health (CDH) at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences facilitates the implementation of education, clinics, research and outreach through interactive video (IAV). Working with organizations throughout Arkansas and across the country, the CDH can provide training and program development support to any institution.

Connect with CDH 
Arkansas Children's Hospital (ACH) brings pediatric health care and consultation close to home for families across the state of Arkansas. ACH telehealth programs support a statewide system of care for children needing primary and subspecialty care services, making them better today and healthier tomorrow.




Connect with ACH
Avizia offers the only end-to-end telehealth platform that integrates industry leading video devices with clinical workflow management and HIPAA-compliant communications software. With solutions throughout 29 states, 38 countries and 7 of the top 10 U.S. hospitals, Avizia is enabling continuity of care by connecting any provider to any patient in any place.



Connect with Avizia
 
Serving more than 200,000 people across southern Middle Tennessee, Maury Regional Medical Center, a 255-bed facility, is the largest medical center between Nashville and Huntsville. Maury Regional has been evaluated by outside organizations and compared to some of the most respected medical centers in the country.





Connect with Maury Regional Health
The Mid-Atlantic Telehealth Resource Center (MATRC) offers technical assistance and consultation services, state-specific and topical information, an inventory of telehealth providers, strategic planning support and hosts an annual regional telehealth summit for the purpose of advancing the use of telemedicine. As a regional telehealth resource center, the MATRC service area includes:  Delaware, District of Columbia, Kentucky, Maryland, New Jersey (Central & South), North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West VIrginia.

Connect with MATRC
 
One Vision Solutions designs, implements and supports high-quality, unified communication platforms. One Vision partners with leading manufacturers including Cisco, Polycom, DirectPacket, Vidyo, Avizia, Extron, Crestron and more to meet the current and future needs of clients while providing the best investment protection through DirectResponse support.


Connect with One Vision Solutions
Telemedicine Magazine is a new publication that charts health care's digital future by linking practicing clinicians - the backbone of the health care system - with the tech innovators who are turning the care system on its head.





Connect with Telemedicine Magazine
 
The University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) Center for Telehealth offers generalized and specialized health care remotely. Using interactive, online video tools, UMMC physicians and care teams can examine, treat and monitor patients and consult with remote providers and caregivers in other locations.

Connect with UMMC Center for Telehealth
The Upper Midwest Telehealth Resource Center (UMTRC) is a consortium of active telehealth organizations that provide educational and outreach presentations as well as technical assistance for the states of Indiana, Illinois, Michigan and Ohio.



Connect with UMTRC
Exhibitors
Thank you for joining us in Nashville! 

Friday, June 10, 2016

Jordan Jarvis started a discussion in Young Professionals Chronic Disease Network:
---Statement by the Young Professionals Chronic Disease Network in Response to Astrazeneca CEO’s comments on free cancer drugs for Africa---
Thursday, June 9, the BBC reported that the CEO of pharma giant AstraZeneca, Pascal Soriot, announced that, when it comes to cancer in “Africa, we could give our products away and it would make no difference.”
Dr. Fidel Rubagumya, a member of the YP-CDN, a global community of over 5,000 health advocates, says that, “As someone who was trained as a medical student in Africa, practiced as a cancer treating non-oncologist medical doctor in a rural Rwanda and now training as a clinical oncologist in Africa, I found Mr. Soriot’s statements absurd and saddening.”
Soriot’s statement echoes the comment made by Bayer CEO Marijn Dekkers in 2014, that the company’s cancer medicines were made for “Western patients who can afford it”. The AstraZeneca CEO further declared that the implementation and infrastructure challenges to deliver the necessary healthcare in Africa are too great. This is an old and disproven argument that kept HIV/AIDS medicines out of the hands of patients in low resource countries prior to 2002.
Dr. Rubagumya remarks that, “Mr. Soriot has never sat with a breast cancer patient who can’t afford two meals a day to tell her that the drug she needs to survive will cost USD 1000! The patient literally laughs at you, despite the excruciating cancer and heartbreaking reality of their situation. We are starting to make progress. For example, the Rwandan Government’s work with global partners has enabled patients with cancers, such as Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, to now be treated at Butaro Cancer Center in Rwanda just as they’d be treated in Boston.”
“The message AstraZeneca is sending is that if you cannot afford to pay for exorbitant cancer drug prices, you don’t deserve treatment,” says Jordan Jarvis, YP-CDN’s Executive Director. “In 2012, the African continent saw 645,000 diagnosed new cancer cases and 456,000 cancer deaths per year. Last year, the World Health Organization added 16 new lifesaving medicines for cancer to their Model List of Essential Medicines, which guides drug procurement, reimbursement and donations worldwide. Access to cancer treatment, just like lifesaving treatment for other diseases, is a human right.”
As the humanitarian aid organization Medicins Sans Frontiers has previously stated, “Drug companies claim to care about global health needs, but their track record says otherwise.” Health advocates have been fighting for affordable medicines, mostly for infectious diseases in the global south for about two decades. Increasingly, this battle is including medicines for cancer and other chronic diseases. “With current cancer drug prices that break the bank for even the wealthiest health systems, all countries now need to stand up against drug company price gouging and R&D policies that deny life to the poor,” stated Jarvis. “This kind of medical apartheid is unacceptable from anyone in 2016, much less the head of a major drug corporation.” 

Monday, May 23, 2016

sustainabiilityyouth10000 unconfirmed rumor - kim will leave world bank under presidency of trump and help china and south korea redesign their health services-


apart from cultural partnerships inspired by pope francis and origin of preferential option poor model in peru of late 1960s Kim's favorite project over 5 years at world bank is futiure of-goals-china's health service; while his most effective action was urgency of collaboration around ebola- zero progress on community health workers mooc and hacking worldbank has underused kim's value of professional youthmovements by 10 to 100 fold; failure as yet to turn baltimore into aid's local supercity dc health lab is one of obama's saddest hours



Ophelia Dahl

Ophelia Dahl has been advocating for the health and rights of poor people for nearly 30 years. In 1983, she volunteered at the small Eye Care Haiti clinic in Haiti’s impoverished Central Plateau. There she met Paul Farmer, and they have been working ever since to deliver high-quality health care to the destitute sick. Dahl has served as chair of the board since 2000 and served as executive director from 2001 to 2015. She is a graduate of Wellesley College and the recipient of the Union Medal by Union Theological Seminary. Dahl is chairman of Dahl & Dahl LLP, which manages the literary estate of her late father, the writer Roald Dahl. She also serves as vice president on the board of Roald Dahl’s Museum and Story Centre.
 

Paul Farmer

Dr. Paul Farmer, physician and anthropologist, is chief strategist and co-founder of Partners In Health, Kolokotrones University Professor and chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and chief of the Division of Global Health Equity at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. He also serves as U.N. Special Adviser to the Secretary-General on Community-based Medicine and Lessons from Haiti. Dr. Farmer has written extensively on health, human rights, and the consequences of social inequality. His most recent books are In the Company of the Poor: Conversations with Dr. Paul Farmer and Fr. Gustavo GutiĆ©rrez,Reimagining Global Health: An Introduction, and To Repair the World: Paul Farmer Speaks to the Next Generation.
 

Jim Yong Kim

Jim Yong Kim, M.D., Ph.D., is president of the World Bank Group. A physician and anthropologist, Dr. Kim has dedicated himself to international development for more than two decades. Before joining the World Bank, Kim served as president of Dartmouth College and held professorships at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health. From 2003-2005, as director of the World Health Organization’s HIV/AIDS Department, Dr. Kim led the “3 by 5” initiative, the first global goal for AIDS treatment, which expanded AIDS treatment in developing countries. He has received a MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship and has been recognized as one of America’s “25 Best Leaders” by U.S. News & World Report.
 

Todd McCormack

Todd McCormack is a founding board member of Partners In Health and a senior corporate vice president at IMG Media, the largest independent producer and distributor of sports programming in the world. He previously served as CEO of TWI Interactive, an independently financed IMG company that managed IMG’s new media rights from 1999-2003. McCormack continues to spearhead IMG special projects and supports the company’s digital media business and also works independently with digital media businesses as an angel investor and advisor. He is a member of CommonAngels, a group that invests in innovative information technology companies, and an advisor to Livestream.
 

Tom White

Since its beginning, Tom White enabled Partners In Health to do “whatever it takes” to improve the lives and health of patients in destitute communities around the world, whether financing the construction of a small clinic in Cange, purchasing a microscope, or paying $30,000 per patient for PIH’s first multidrug-resistant tuberculosis program. The owner and president of construction company J.F. White Contracting Co., he helped found PIH with his first $1 million donation and then systematically gave away his wealth—tens of millions of dollars—by selling his company, his assets, and his house to continue supporting PIH projects aimed at alleviating human suffering and poverty. He died peacefully in Boston Jan. 7, 2011.