ByeBye human race unless you can help us find medical word's top 10 World Record Jobs Creators 9 8 7 ...Ironically knowledge of the curriculum of entrepreneurial revolution - as the net generation's opportunity to collaborate in human sustainability peaked in 1984 - unless you can help World Record Jobs Creators retrieve it now - thanks chris macrae wash dc text 240 316 8157 EconomistDiary.com ERworld.tv amychina.net Anyone seriously transparent about affordable global health and sustainability needs to develop segments of health services and then decide whether an integrated service is still to have place boundaries. THE BLOCKCHAIN WARS. New media is always a battle between the forces for evil who linkin fast and those who needed to open space for a deeper social order (which takes time). Understanding blockchain mapping will also be absolutely essential: it may be how sustainability's last call is won by little sisters or lost to big brothers. these are the most exciting times to be alive.. 4 markets human sustainability depends on health & . linkedin UNwomens - question collab blog editors: chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk washington DC

china; Qatar bangladesh and asean ghana france india

usa CHINA UNICORNS

good news china's robot teachers assistants will soon be better at diagnosis than 99% of docs. china



online library of norman macrae...world record jobs creators: sir fazle abed .. jim kim.JKU. larry brilliant.. gerge soros..paul farmer .leana wen .BillionGirlsBoys network
health.nutrition.edu.green.job


Tuesday, April 23, 2019

important clues on preventing dangers of bird flu https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/tv/directtalk/20190423/2058348/  Ayato Takada is a virologist who tracks down new and mysterious strains of disease. He recently discovered an antibody that can fight Ebola. We asked him about studying viruses on the front lines.

Saturday, February 2, 2019

womenuni.com timezone 1960s- just before moon landing gordon moore published moores law - and dad normanmacrae at the economist published entrepreneurial revolution what will happen to sustaining millennial girls & boys futures if we  need to mediate 4000+ moore coms tech 2030 vs 1946?

WORLDS BIGGEST MATHS CRISIS
it was predicted : somewhere around 2019 both exponential converged mathematically - with moores silicon chip having more binary switching than a human brain and ERworld/alumnisat acceleratinmg through 1000 times to 2000 times moore

at that time as china's and UNCTAD's greatest connector of #digitalcooperation have clarified - statistians of the quality of james wilson suddenly become important again

AIdemocracy.com
someone has to feed the artificial intelligences and if it not the statistician most able to value sustaionability expoentials - you guessed it - nature will send humans to dodo space

back in 1984 father mapped why one simple way for we the peoples to track whether tech was valuing youth;s sustainbvility- if universal basic health comes 10 times less costly- read his 1984 economist survey or join us here to change the future of education ending classrooms for dodos


these are the most exciting times to be alive
world's most valuable innovations
chinawise.org
World Record Book of

Transparency Declaration

I have Ma in Statistics from Corpus Christi Cambridge 1973 where dad Norman Macrae Order-Rising-Sun Gold Bars got first in economics mentored by Keynes circa 1947 chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk - my maternal grandad was mediated by Mahatma Gandhi for 25 yerar prior to writing up legalese for India's Independence. One of dad's livelihood projects after 40 years of sub-editing poverty alleviation at The Economist was biography of John Von Neumann who must be sad at how bad exponentisl maths and how dumbing down false internet companies are spinning 


Global-maths-error=GDP

macrae
EconomistHealth.com Intangible Hi-trust Goodwill, Finance-E-Digital-Cooperation, BAi

great rockefeller/beijing summit but can health wait 100 years

https://assets.rockefellerfoundation.org/app/uploads/20130126182958/1b8843cc-0d4c-4d5e-bf35-4c7b2fbbb63d-the.pdf
Summit delegates and contributions Rebecca Affolder, Global Health Advisor, United Nations Sudhir Anand, Professor of Economics, University of Oxford Le Vu Anh, Professor of Epidemiology and Founding Dean, Hanoi School of Public Health Francis Asenso-Boadi, Deputy Director, Research & Development, National Health Insurance Authority Richard Ayah, Fellow and Lecturer at the School of Public Health, University of Nairobi David Baltimore, Professor of Biology, California Institute of Technology Melissa A. Berman, President and CEO, Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors Agnes Binagwaho, Minister of Health, Rwanda Fred Binka, Dean of the School of Public Health and Professor of Epidemiology, University of Ghana Jiming Cai, Vice President and Secretary General, Chinese Preventive Medicine Association Kalipso Chalkidou, Founding Director, International National Institute for Health and Care Excellence Ann Chao, Director, Cancer Research Programs, East Asia, Center for Global Health, National Cancer Institute Ying Chen, General Manager Assistant, Northeast Pharmaceutical Group Sales Co., Ltd. Virasakdi Chongsuvivatwong, Professor of Community Medicine, Songkhla University Mickey Chopra, Chief of Health, UNICEF Pran Gopal Datta, Vice Chancellor, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University Sally Davies, Chief Medical Officer, United Kingdom Rachel Duan, President and CEO, GE Healthcare, China Timothy Evans, Dean, James P. Grant School of Public Health, BRAC University Alex Ezeh, Executive Director, African Population and Health Research Centre Jing Fang, Director at the Institute of Health Sciences, Kunming Medical University Anna Feng, Program Coordinator, China, GBCHealth Godfrey Firth, Director, Government Relations, GE Healthcare, China Julio Frenk, Dean, Harvard School of Public Health Laurie Garrett, Senior Fellow for Global Health, Council on Foreign Relations (US) Teguest Guerma, Director General, African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF) Yan Guo, Professor, Peking University School of Public Health Muhammad Azizul Haque, Ambassador, Embassy of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh Richard Horton, Chief Editor, The Lancet Yanzhong Huang, Senior Fellow for Global Health, Council on Foreign Relations (US) Min Huh, HM Networks Dale Huntington, Director, Asia Pacific Observatory on Health Systems and Policies, World Health Organization Mohammad Mushtuq Husain, Principal Scientific Officer, Institute of Epidemiology Disease Control and Research (IEDCR) Udom Kachintorn, Dean and Clinical Professor of Medicine, Mahidol University Patrick Kadama, Director, African Centre for Global Health and Social Transformation, Uganda Stephen Keith, Physician Kim Nyegaard Meredith, Executive Director, Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, Stanford University Ann Marie Kimball, Senior Program Officer, Global Health, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Michael Klag, Dean, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Ricardo Lagos Escobar, Former President, Chile John Langenbrunner, Lead Economist, The World Bank Gabriel Leung, Professor and Head, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong Depei Liu, Former President, Peking Union Medical College Yuanli Liu, Senior Lecturer on International Health, Harvard University Rene Loewenson, Director, Training and Research Support Centre Robyn Long, Associate Director, Institutional Partnerships, International, Harvard School of Public Health Hedong Lv, General Manager, Strategy and Investment Department, Founder Group Jing Ma, Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School Ajay Mahal, Finkel Chair of Global Health, Monash University Andrew John Paul Makaka, Director of Health Financing, Ministry of Health, Rwanda Jonna Mazet, Professor and Director, One Health Institute Jeffrey McFarland, Country Director, CDC, China Diane McIntyre, Professor, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town Qingyue Meng, Dean, Peking University School of Public Health Anne Mills, Vice Director and Professor of Health Economics and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Zexun Mu, Vice President, Beijing Holley Cotec Pharmaceuticals Hongli Niu, Chief Section Member, Department of Health, Policy and Legislation, China Ministry of Health Wendy O’Neill, Board Member, China Medical Board Ariel Pablos-Mendez, Assistant Administrator for Global Health, USAID Soulivanh Pholsena, Executive Assistant to the Minister of Health, Laos Jianrong Qiao, British Embassy Hossain Zillur Rahman, Founder, Power and Participation Research Centre Bangladesh Srinath K. Reddy, President, Public Health Foundation of India Mariel Reed, Project Coordinator, China Medical Board Beijing Office Maria Rendon, Development Counselor, U.S. Embassy/ USAID David Rustein, Vice President, Medical Affairs, United Family Healthcare Group Mark Rweyemamu, Executive Director, Southern African Centre for Infectious Diseases Michael Shiu, Vice President and Regional Director, China, GBC Health Alfred Sommer, Dean Emeritus, Bloomberg School of Public Health, and University Distinguished Service Professor, Johns Hopkins University Nguyen Thi Kim Tien, Minister of Health, Vietnam Huong Thi Giang Tran, Director General, Ministry of Health, Vietnam Eksavang Vongvichit, Minister of Health, Laos Gang Wang, Assistant Country Director, China, U.S. Food and Drug Administration Feng Wang, Director, BrookingsTsinghua Center Mona Wang, Senior Communications Manager, GE Healthcare, China Peng Wang, PMO Director, Chinese Preventive Medicine Association Joseph Kibuchi Wangombe, Associate Professor, Department of Community Health, University of Nairobi Ruimin Wei, President, Beijing Health TV Marketing Co. Miriam K. Were, Co-Founder UZIMA Foundation Suwit Wibulpolprasert, Senior Advisor on Disease Control Ministry of Public Health, Thailand Feiyu Wo, Vice President, PKU International Hospital Founder Group Hong Xie, General Manager Sequenom China Ming Xu, Vice President China Chamber of Commerce for Import & Export of Medicines & Health Products (CCCMHPIE) Sue Yuan, US Embassy David Zakus, Director, Office of Global Health, University of Alberta Yi-Xin Zeng, President, Peking Union Medical College Debrework Zewdie, Deputy Executive Director, Global Fund for AIDS, TB, and Malaria Jiahui Zhang, National Development and Reform Commission Bing Zhou, Novartis China Interview respondents Michell Zappa, Envisioning Technology, Brazil Connie Walyaro, President, International Young Professionals Foundation, Kenya Jim Kim, President, World Bank, US Rockefeller Foundation Carolyn Bancroft, Senior Program Associate Charlanne Burke, Senior Program Associate Neill Coleman, Vice President, Global Communications Ashvin Dayal, Managing Director, Asia Ann Fudge, Member, Board of Trustees Helene Gayle, Member, Board of Trustees Heather Grady, Vice President, Foundation Initiatives Alice Huang, Member, Board of Trustees Mwihaki Kimura Muraguri, Associate Director, Health, Africa Chun Lai, Deputy Chief Investment Officer Robert Marten, Program Associate, Strive Masiyiwa, Member, Board of Trustees Sheetal Matani, Research and Project Manager Michael Myers, Senior Policy Officer and Director Centennial Programming David Rockefeller, Jr., Board Chair Judith Rodin, President Keisha Senter, Associate Director Sheila Smith, Executive Assistant Jeanette Vega, Managing Director

Monday, January 14, 2019

SOLAR FOR HEALTH

5 ways solar power can make universal healthcare a reality

United Nations Development Programme
By UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME
CONTRIBUTED TO CAUSES & COMMUNITY
No woman should give birth in the dark. No surgery should be carried out by candlelight. And no child should be left vulnerable to disease because vaccines cannot be refrigerated. For too long, a lack of reliable power has prevented people in remote and rural communities from accessing the healthcare they need, when they need it. As the race for universal energy access picks up pace, here are five ways renewable energy can help protect quality healthcare for the world’s poorest.
Hora Chipo (midwife) delivers a healthy baby girl to Yvonne Nkata  at the Chongwe District Hospital, Lusaka Province Zambia.
Hora Chipo (midwife) delivers a healthy baby girl to Yvonne Nkata at the Chongwe District Hospital, Lusaka Province Zambia.

1. PROVIDING ACCESS

Nearly one billion people live without electricity, and 50 percent of them are found in sub-Saharan Africa alone[1]. Energy poverty prevents access to healthcare for millions of vulnerable people around the world. Health clinics, maternity wards, surgery blocks, medical warehouses, and laboratories rely on electricity to refrigerate medicines, power the lights and operate life-saving medical devices. Intermittent or unreliable power source puts lives at risk.
“The worst was seeing a new-born baby dying,” says David Masara, Sister in Charge at Budiriro Polyclinic in Zimbabwe, “and I couldn’t do anything because we didn’t have any source of power.”
UNDP’s Solar for Health initiative is supporting governments to install solar systems in health centres and clinics in rural areas to reach underserved communities. The aim is to ensure healthcare for all, wherever they may be, and that no one is left behind.
The Solar panels at the Sipepa Rural Hospital ensure that the clinic is able to function adequately at night, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe.
“The Government of Zimbabwe desires to have the highest possible level of healthcare and quality of life for its citizens regardless of their geographical location,” explained Clive Marimo – Director for Hospital Planning and Infrastructure in the Ministry of Health and Child Care, Zimbabwe.
“The rolling-out of the Solar for health project tallied well with the ministry’s strategic plan of improving primary healthcare. Most primary healthcare facilities located remotely are off grid and the solar project transformed the services of such facilities where basic procedures were not possible due to unavailability of a power source,” he continued.
For example, maternal mortality is higher for women living in rural areas and among poorer communities[2]. The installation of solar panels in Zimbabwe is helping to ensure that health care workers can reduce complications during and following pregnancy and childbirth.
“The issue of lack of power is no longer an issue at all,” David says now. “Pregnant women can deliver their babies in stable conditions.”
Nontethelelo Gumale,  9 months pregnant,  at the mothers’ home at the Nkayi District Hospital in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. There, expectant mothers prepare their meals together, and reap the benefits of uninterrupted power supply when it is time to give birth.
Nontethelelo Gumale, 9 months pregnant, at the mothers’ home at the Nkayi District Hospital in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. There, expectant mothers prepare their meals together, and reap the benefits of uninterrupted power supply when it is time to give birth.
Irene Mdewa holds a healthy baby girl she helped deliver via cesarean section. The operating room at the Nkayi District Hospital is now able to function adequately without the life-threatening power cuts of the past. Bulawayo, Zimbabwe.
Irene Mdewa holds a healthy baby girl she helped deliver via cesarean section. The operating room at the Nkayi District Hospital is now able to function adequately without the life-threatening power cuts of the past. Bulawayo, Zimbabwe.
Solar panels  now power the Sipepa Rural Hospital in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, providing the consistent power supply needed for vaccine refrigerators and many life-saving medical devices.
Solar panels now power the Sipepa Rural Hospital in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, providing the consistent power supply needed for vaccine refrigerators and many life-saving medical devices.

2. ENSURING QUALITY

Quality healthcare requires a dependable source of power. For instance, maintaining the ‘cold chain’ for vaccines and medicines is essential and requires refrigeration, cold rooms and IT systems for stock management.
“The Solar for Health is very important in the supply and management of medical and surgical consumables, most so, the cold chain,” explained Dr Mwale Consity, Provincial Director for Lusaka, Zambia.
“Vaccines, which are basically the future of our country, remain potent and viable,” he continued.
Previously in Zambia, power interruptions regularly affected the refrigeration of medicines and vaccines. Yet with support from UNDP and the Norwegian Emergency Preparedness System, Zambia’s 7,000 m2 national medical warehouse now has solar panels on its roof. Covering roughly the size of a football pitch, the panels provide uninterrupted power for the refrigeration of life-saving medicines and vaccines.
Solar panels on the roof of the national medical warehouse in Lusaka, Zambia, which stores and distributes pharmaceutical health products, like vaccines and essential medicines, across the country.
“There shouldn’t be any break in the way the temperatures are maintained,” explains Naomy Nthele, Sister in Charge at Chongwe District Hospital in Zambia.
“With continuous power supply, we know that our vaccines are safe and effective,” she says.
Nurse Gezile Maseko refrigerates newly received vaccines. During the postnatal visit, Nurse Maseko gives 7-day-old baby Anson his polio vaccine. Shabasonje Health Centre, Shibuyunji District, Zambia.
Solar power has also improved the quality of health services provided by ensuring effective, safe healthcare, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
“We used to tell patients to come with candles. Sometimes we were even using the torchlight on the phone. It was very, very difficult for us,” said Veronica Lungi, Nurse and midwife at Chikumbi Health Post in Zambia.
“After they connected the solar panels, every night we’d switch on the lights. It was amazing – it was like a dream.”
Midwife Chipago Nilimo uses a fetal heart rate monitor to assist a mother in labour. Chongwe District Hospital, Lusaka Province, Zambia.

3. REDUCING COSTS

Using solar power helps health facilities save money, which can be reinvested to support other priority health programmes.
 “The health sector is saving quite a lot; for instance, on the amount of money they would have been spending on diesel power generation,” explained Ian Millimo, UNDP Zambia Assistant Resident Representative.
“You’ll tend to see a saving of up to 40 percent in some facilities.”
UNDP also estimates a 100 percent return on investment within two to five years, when health facilities with unreliable energy sources install solar systems.
While the world is waking up to the power of renewable energy, progress needs to be accelerated and taken to scale. Although investments are increasing year on year, in 2017, globally just 12.1 percent of power came from renewable energy [3].
General view of the Shabasonje health centre. Since the implementation of the solar panels on the roof of the clinic, there is an uninterrupted supply of electricity which ensures that vaccines stay cold and do not spoil

4. BUILDING RESILIENCE

Solar energy is also contributing to more resilient health systems. In Zimbabwe, in partnership with the government and the Global Fund, UNDP has equipped 405 health facilities with solar systems to strengthen national systems for health.
“We are targeting four priority areas” explained Pfungwa Mukweza, Monitoring and Evaluation Officer, UNDP Zimbabwe. “The health information system, the cold chain, the maternity and the lab.”
Cricensia Tshu takes vaccines to the refrigerator at the Budiriro Polyclinic Harare. Thanks to the solar panels, vaccines remain at a cool and constant temperature even when there are power cuts. Sipepa Rural Hospital, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe.
Regular power cuts meant health facilities in Zimbabwe previously faced IT challenges. This impeded effective data collection and management, which is essential for managing patient files and tracking cold chain data. The introduction of solar has helped to solve this issue.
“Now we have credible data we can actually rely on,” says David Masara.
The consistent source of energy provided by solar power also helps the health sector to withstand the negative impacts of climate change, including extreme weather events, droughts, and other shocks that affect access to the traditional power supply.
Furthermore, Solar for Health is helping countries to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. Energy plays a vital role in enabling health care delivery, but can also inflict significant environmental harm: energy production and use is the single biggest contributor to global warming [4]. The decommissioning of highly polluting and noisy diesel generators also considerably improves the local environment.
Lead nurse Nathan Gondwe checks a child’s temperature. Mulalika Clinic, Lusaka Province Zambia.
Lead nurse Nathan Gondwe checks a child’s temperature. Mulalika Clinic, Lusaka Province Zambia.
Since the installation of the solar panels, Nigel Ndebele is able to enter data without interruption. Sipepa Rural Hospital Bulawayo Zimbabwe.
Since the installation of the solar panels, Nigel Ndebele is able to enter data without interruption. Sipepa Rural Hospital Bulawayo Zimbabwe.
Letwin Gatsi, the microscopist in Laboratory at the Budiriro, Polyclinic Harare, no longer has to stop her lab work because of power cuts. Budiriro, Polyclinic, Harare, Zimbabwe.
Letwin Gatsi, the microscopist in Laboratory at the Budiriro, Polyclinic Harare, no longer has to stop her lab work because of power cuts. Budiriro, Polyclinic, Harare, Zimbabwe.

5.INVESTING IN SUSTAINABILITY

UNDP is working in partnership with governments and local communities to ensure the sustainability of Solar for Health initiatives, including system maintenance.
“We are working hand in hand with the government so that we can come up with a plan for repairs, maintenance and replacement of the batteries and even the solar panels,” says Pfungwa Mukweza.
As solar systems continue to promote better availability and quality of health services, particularly in remote, hard-to-reach areas, they are contributing to universal health coverage. In Zambia, Veronica, a grandmother, explained what having the local health facility equipped with solar power meant to the local community.
“We were encouraged to come to this clinic because there is hope here,” she said.
Baby Veronica is born to Silvia N’gandu at 9am at the Chikumbi Health Centre, Zambia.
Baby Veronica is born to Silvia N’gandu at 9am at the Chikumbi Health Centre, Zambia.
UNDP’s Solar for Health initiative is supporting governments to install solar systems in health facilities across Africa, the Arab States and Central Asia, helping to provide reliable and cost-effective access to electricity while also reducing emissions which harm the environment.
In line with the UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021 and as outlined in the UNDP 2016-2021 HIV, Health and Development Strategy: Connecting the Dots, Solar for Health is making a contribution to many of the goals of the 2030 Agenda and its commitment to ‘leave no one behind’. By utilizing technologies to ensure healthcare delivery reaches remote and under-served communities it is helping countries in their efforts to achieve SDGs 3, 7, 13 and 17: good health and well-being, affordable and clean energy, climate action and partnerships.