join us at astra.place to vote on which eu leaders are sustainable
scandals 20 years in making - how govs underinvested in basic mnra research ...also 20 years ago i was lucky to meet a professor of nature at bath uni -i am terrified by what he knows but top down medical bureaucrats dont

1 twitter smart virus lists v0 v2 ==

rsvp chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk sources by and for all -why experts in ebola are not in covid

close encounters:
of healthy kind, of servant leader kind, of food security, of education kind, of credit kind, of solar kind, of other machine intel kind
37th year of economist debate- who will get last mile in time forpost-covid's sdg generation?- biden?, africa?, bangladesh?, far east islands, rest asia continent, euro, latinam, womens lives, colored lives...my second most exciting moment in life- meeting sir fazle abed 1 2- he had designed a rural health service for one of the ten most populous nations from scratch? which do you think sir fazle need more help from health genii or financial genii? -more here

2020 telehealth hinge moment
our biggest challenge in 2020s is not the virus it is failing to unite around designing a world so next girl or boy born has a joyful chance at a productive life- that depends on 3 skills thriving in ever community - the health servant (economisthealth.com), the livelihood educator (economistuniversity.com) and the financial servant (economistbank.com.)
however we have known since the end of world war 2 that we need new maps than those that 8 largest empires had ruled planet with - and that 4 new technologies and types of mediation will multiply this sustainably up or crashing down until mother natures selects us as next dod- more at girlsworldbank.com
who published 13 global health challenges 1/13/2020 - help update them -related search malaria : fda -messy https://www.the-scientist.com/news-opinion/nih-cancels-funding-for-bat-coronavirus-research-project-67486

virus unknowns help unwomens list some twitter dialogues 1 2 3 chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk
ByeBye human race unless you can help us find medical word's top 10 World Record Jobs Creators 9 8 7 ...Ironically knowledge of the curriculum of entrepreneurial revolution - as the net generation's opportunity to collaborate in human sustainability peaked in 1984 - unless you can help World Record Jobs Creators retrieve it now - thanks chris macrae wash dc text 240 316 8157 EconomistDiary.com ERworld.tv amychina.net Anyone seriously transparent about affordable global health and sustainability needs to develop segments of health services and then decide whether an integrated service is still to have place boundaries. THE BLOCKCHAIN WARS. New media is always a battle between the forces for evil who linkin fast and those who needed to open space for a deeper social order (which takes time). Understanding blockchain mapping will also be absolutely essential: it may be how sustainability's last call is won by little sisters or lost to big brothers. these are the most exciting times to be alive.. 4 markets human sustainability depends on health & . linkedin UNwomens - question collab blog editors: chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk washington DC

china; Qatar bangladesh and asean ghana france india

usa CHINA UNICORNS

good news china's robot teachers assistants will soon be better at diagnosis than 99% of docs. china
............



online library of norman macrae...world record jobs creators: sir fazle abed .. jim kim.JKU. larry brilliant.. gerge soros..paul farmer .leana wen .BillionGirlsBoys network
health.nutrition.edu.green.job


Thursday, October 15, 2020

 how politicians in usa faked health

Illustration of a hand holding a cracked microscope slide containing the U.S. flag.

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Crafting successful public health measures depends on the ability of top scientists to gather data and report their findings unrestricted to policymakers.

State of play: But concern has spiked among health experts and physicians over what they see as an assault on key science protections, particularly during a raging pandemic. And a move last week by President Trump, via an executive order, is triggering even more worries.

What's happening: If implemented, the order creates a "Schedule F" class of federal employees who are policymakers from certain agencies who would no longer have protection against being easily fired — and would likely include some veteran civil service scientists who offer key guidance to Congress and the White House.

  • Those agencies might handle the order differently, and it is unclear how many positions could fall under Schedule F — but some say possibly thousands.
  • "This much-needed reform will increase accountability in essential policymaking positions within the government," OMB director Russ Vought tells Axios in a statement.

What they're saying: Several medical associations, including the Infectious Diseases Society of America, strongly condemned the action, and Democrats on the House oversight panel demanded the administration "immediately cease" implementation.

  • "If you take how it's written at face value, it has the potential to turn every government employee into a political appointee, who can be hired and fired at the whim of a political appointee or even the president," says University of Colorado Boulder's Roger Pielke Jr.
  • Protections for members of civil service allow them to argue for evidence-based decision-making and enable them to provide the best advice, says CRDF Global's Julie Fischer, adding that "federal decision-makers really need access to that expertise — quickly and ideally in house."

Between the lines: Politics plays some role in science, via funding, policymaking and national security issues.

  • The public health system is a mix of agency leaders who are political appointees, like HHS Secretary Alex Azar, and career civil servants not dependent on the president's approval, like NIAID director Anthony Fauci.
  • "Public health is inherently political because it has to do with controlling the way human beings move around," says University of Pennsylvania's Jonathan Moreno.

Yes, but: The norm is to have a robust discussion — and what has been happening under the Trump administration is not the norm, some say.

  • "Schedule F is just remarkable," Pielke says. "It's not like political appointees editing a report, [who are] working within the system to kind of subvert the system. This is an effort to completely redefine the system."
  • The Center for Strategic and International Studies' Stephen Morrison says that the administration has been defying normative practices, including statements denigrating scientists, the CDC and FDA.

The big picture: Public trust in scientists, which tends to be high, is taking a hit, not only due to messaging from the administration but also from public confusion over changes in guidance, which vacillated over masks and other suggestions.

  • Public health institutions "need to have the trust of the American people. In order to have the trust of the American people, they can't have their autonomy and their credibility compromised, and they have to have a voice," Morrison says.
  • "If you deny CDC the ability to have briefings for the public, and you take away control over authoring their guidance, and you attack them and discredit them so public perceptions of them are negative, you are taking them out of the game and leaving the stage completely open for falsehoods," he adds.
  • "All scientists don't agree on all the evidence, every time. But what we do agree on is that there's a process. We look at what we know, we decide what we can clearly recommend based on what we know, sometimes when we learn more, we change our recommendations, and that's the scientific process," Fischer says.

What's next: The scientific community is going to need to be proactive on rebuilding public trust in how the scientific process works and being clear when guidance changes and why it has changed, Fischer says.



 



A Financial System That Extracts Wealth Instead of Creating It

Podcast featuring Dennis Kelleher

Dennis Kelleher, President of the NGO Better Markets, outlines how the financial system is serving the wealthy, how it has been reformed in the past and how it can be reformed again to serve Main Street instead of Wall Street.

Sunday, October 4, 2020

 Opinion

Scared That Covid-19 Immunity Won’t Last? Don’t Be

Dropping antibody counts aren’t a sign that our immune system is failing against the coronavirus, nor an omen that we can’t develop a viable vaccine.

Dr. Iwasaki and Dr. Medzhitov are professors of immunobiology at Yale.

Credit...Christoph Burgstedt/Science Photo Library, via Getty Images

Within the last couple of months, several scientific studies have come out — some peer-reviewedothers not — indicating that the antibody response of people infected with SARS-CoV-2 dropped significantly within two months. The news has sparked fears that the very immunity of patients with Covid-19 may be waning fast — dampening hopes for the development of an effective and durable vaccine.

But these concerns are confused and mistaken.

Both our bodies’ natural immunity and immunity acquired through vaccination serve the same function, which is to inhibit a virus and prevent it from causing a disease. But they don’t always work quite the same way.

And so a finding that naturally occurring antibodies in some Covid-19 patients are fading doesn’t actually mean very much for the likely efficacy of vaccines under development. Science, in this case, can be more effective than nature.

The human immune system has evolved to serve two functions: expediency and precision. Hence, we have two types of immunity: innate immunity, which jumps into action within hours, sometimes just minutes, of an infection; and adaptive immunity, which develops over days and weeks.